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  `* Re: Controversial EU copyright law faces final voteAnonUser
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Subject: Controversial EU copyright law faces final vote
From: AnonUser@rslight.i2p (AnonUser)
Newsgroups: rocksolid.shared.news
Organization: NovaBBS
Date: Tue, 26 Mar 2019 08:34 UTC

https://www.rt.com/news/454753-article-13-europe-copyright/

"It remains to be seen whether the European Parliament is willing to defy the will of the people for short-term profits."

Really, this is something to wonder?

Article:
 What is Article 13? Controversial EU copyright law faces final vote
Published time: 26 Mar, 2019 06:49
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What is Article 13? Controversial EU copyright law faces final vote
© Global Look / Ben Kriemann

    26

A hotly-contested copyright provision is haunting Europe, troubling internet freedom advocates and content creators alike. Article 13, facing its final vote, would place heavy restrictions on content sharing, from films to memes.

The proposed law requires anyone sharing copyrighted content to obtain permission from rights owners, even if the content is just an animated gif on Twitter. Even repurposing an image for a meme would require permission from the image's creator, because while memes are protected as parodies under current copyright law, an automated filter is incapable of distinguishing between a parody and a ripoff.
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If the new directive passes, user-generated content platforms from Facebook to Wikipedia would be forced to implement “upload filters” to ensure material doesn’t run afoul of someone else’s copyright or risk being sued. The filter would analyze the content being uploaded, compare it to a database of copyrighted works, and either permit its passage or kick it back to the uploader. Prohibitively expensive, vulnerable to bugs, and prone to extensive collateral censorship, such filters have the potential to effectively hobble the free exchange of information the internet has come to represent.

A version of Article 13 passed the Parliament in September despite widespread public outcry and mutated into an even more restrictive proposal during closed-door negotiations between lawmakers and major corporations. It faces a final vote before becoming law.

For these reasons and more, many internet users are aghast at the prospect that the law might pass. It’s hard to imagine the information superhighway reduced to a stop-and-go toll road, even as in recent years speech on social media has become markedly less free.

The notion of shackling the internet to fit copyright demands most creators are not making – essentially shoving the information-freedom genie back in the bottle – has drawn opposition from internet royalty, including Tim Berners-Lee, the inventor of the world wide web himself. Some 70 online pioneers signed a letter warning the legislation turns the web into “a tool for the automated surveillance and control of its users.”

User-generated content platforms, including Reddit, Twitch, Pornhub and Wikipedia, staged protests against their impending doom, blacking their landing pages for a day, while tens of thousands of protesters took to the streets in cities across Europe.

“Dozens of MEPs are undecided on how to vote,” the Electronic Frontier Foundation tweeted, highlighting the “Save Your Internet” campaign it has vowed to fight to the bitter end. “Everyone is against it: artists, small businesses, big businesses, the Internet’s creators, and over 5 million people who signed the petition to stop the censorship machine it would create,” the group said.

It’s hard to find supporters for the restrictive provision outside of member governments and wealthy copyright-holding corporations. “Such sweeping pressure for pre-publication filtering is neither a necessary nor proportionate response to copyright infringement online,” lamented David Kaye, UN special rapporteur on freedom of opinion and expression.
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Recording industry groups IMPALA, Association of Independent Music, Dutch Collecting Society for Music Works, and International Confederation of Societies of Authors and Composers have united to cheer the legislation on. Their fortunes were made before the internet, and will continue even if the internet is crippled with regulations.

It’s no exaggeration to say Article 13 has the potential to change the internet as Europeans know it – and the rest of the world would be foolish to think its effects will stop at the EU’s borders. It remains to be seen whether the European Parliament is willing to defy the will of the people for short-term profits.
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Subject: Re: Controversial EU copyright law faces final vote
From: AnonUser@rslight.i2p (AnonUser)
Newsgroups: rocksolid.shared.news
Organization: NovaBBS
Date: Tue, 26 Mar 2019 22:56 UTC

European Parliament
‏Verified account @Europarl_EN

Copyright: Parliament just voted in favour of the proposed directive on copyright rules for the digital market. Press release to be published soon.
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Subject: Re: Controversial EU copyright law faces final vote
From: anonymous@def2.anon (anonymous)
Newsgroups: rocksolid.shared.news
Organization: def2org
Date: Tue, 26 Mar 2019 17:58 UTC
They have done it again...
https://www.cnet.com/news/article-13-eu-approves-controversial-copyright-law/?linkId=65293073

I wish those motherfuckers all to hell...-- Posted on def2




Subject: Re: Controversial EU copyright law faces final vote
From: yxz@anon.com (yxz)
Newsgroups: rocksolid.shared.news
Organization: def5
Date: Sat, 30 Mar 2019 20:41 UTC

and it seems like it is not only the eu, more like an orchestrated attack:

https://www.attorneygeneral.gov.au/Media/Pages/Tough-new-laws-to-protect-Australians-from-live-streaming-violent-crimes.aspx


Media release

The Hon Scott Morrison MP
Prime Minister

The Hon Christian Porter MP
Attorney-General

Senator The Hon Mitch Fifield
Minister for Communications
Minister for Arts

The Morrison Government will legislate tough new laws to prevent the weaponising of social media platforms and to protect Australians from the live-streaming of violent crimes, such as the Christchurch terror attack.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison said the new legislation would be introduced into Parliament next week as part of the action the Government was taking to keep Australians safe in the wake of the Christchurch terrorist attacks.

“Big social media companies have a responsibility to take every possible action to ensure their technology products are not exploited by murderous terrorists,” the Prime Minister said.

“It should not just be a matter of just doing the right thing. It should be the law. And that is what my Government will be doing next week to force social media companies to get their act together and work with law enforcement and intelligence agencies to defuse the threat their technologies can present to the safety of Australians.

“This is about keeping Australians safe by forcing social media companies to step up and do what the community expects of them to stop terrorists and criminals spreading their hate.

“A new taskforce bringing Government and social media companies together will also ensure we are all working together to deny terrorists the opportunity to use social media as part of their hatred and violence.

“These responses will form the basis of a model approach that Australia can take to the G20 to get our global partners on board to bring social media companies into our collective net of responsibility and accountability. We are already working to this end with our G20 and five eyes partners, including New Zealand.”

The Attorney-General Christian Porter said, “the Criminal Code Amendment (Unlawful Showing of Abhorrent Violent Material) Bill 2019 will include new offences with penalties of up 10 per cent of a company’s annual turnover and potential prison sentences for executives of social media companies who fail to act to remove abhorrent violent material from their platforms.”

“The Morrison Government will always act to keep Australians safe, and that includes keeping Australians safe online.”

Minister for Communications, Mitch Fifield said that “social media companies, like Facebook, which met with the Prime Minister, the Attorney-General, myself and Minister Dutton earlier this week did not present any immediate solutions to the issues arising out of the horror that occurred in Christchurch.”

“We will not allow social media platforms to be weaponised by terrorists and violent extremists who seek to harm and kill and nor would we allow a situation that a young Australian child could log onto social media and watch a mass murder take place.”

The Attorney-General said the amendments would be modelled on existing offences in the Criminal Code which require platforms to notify police if their service is being used to access child pornography.

“Mainstream media that broadcast such material would be putting their licence at risk and there is no reason why social media platforms should be treated any differently,” the Attorney-General said.

“These companies have a social responsibility and they have clearly failed to meet that responsibility in their response to Christchurch. The Morrison Government will force action from these companies through these new laws.”

The Bill will include new provisions to deal with the showing of “abhorrent violent material” which is material produced by a perpetrator, and which plays or livestreams the very worst types of offences. It will capture the playing or streaming of terrorism, murder, attempted murder, torture, rape and kidnapping on social media.

It will include two new sets of offences:

    It will be a criminal offence for social media platforms not to remove abhorrent violent material expeditiously. This will be punishable by 3 years’ imprisonment or fines that can reach up to 10% of the platform’s annual turnover.
    Platforms anywhere in the world must notify the AFP if they become aware their service is streaming abhorrent violent conduct that is happening in Australia. A failure to do this will be punishable by fines of up to $168,000 for an individual or $840,000 for a corporation. The e-Safety Commissioner will be given the power to issue notices that bring this type of material to the attention of the social media companies. As soon as they receive a notice, they will be deemed to be aware of the material, meaning the clock starts ticking for the platform to remove the material or face extremely serious criminal penalties.

“The Bill will not impact the ability of news media to report on events which are in the public interest,” Minister Fifield said.

“Australia’s mainstream media already adopt a sensible approach to broadcasting material which can cause harm to individuals, as is required under their licensing arrangements.”

“The focus of this Bill is to put responsibility back on the social media giants to prevent their platforms being co-opted by terrorists, criminals and violent extremists,” the Attorney-General said.


Posted on def4


Subject: Re: Controversial EU copyright law faces final vote
From: yxz@anon.com (yxz)
Newsgroups: rocksolid.shared.news
Organization: def5
Date: Sat, 30 Mar 2019 20:46 UTC

what might sound reasonable at first glance (who wants to look at that anyway), implies the same technical setup as now in the eu: automated controls of everything you upload. and because the controls will not work right, everybody will want to err on the safe side and be super strict (almost like a whitelisting in the end).
slightly related: reddit has simply closed /r/dankmemes for now, because they don't understand what the new law will imply for them.
it makes me want to puke.

Posted on def4


Subject: Re: Controversial EU copyright law faces final vote
From: yxz@anon.com (yxz)
Newsgroups: rocksolid.shared.news
Organization: def5
Date: Sat, 30 Mar 2019 20:47 UTC

forgot link:
https://www.reddit.com/r/dankmemes/comments/b682gt/regarding_article_13_europes_antimeme_law/

Posted on def4


Subject: Re: Controversial EU copyright law faces final vote
From: AnonUser@rslight.i2p (AnonUser)
Newsgroups: rocksolid.shared.news
Organization: NovaBBS
Date: Sun, 5 May 2019 10:32 UTC
"Platforms anywhere in the world must notify the AFP if they become aware their service is streaming abhorrent violent conduct that is happening in Australia."

Do they even understand how the internet works?

Do they understand jurisdiction?

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Subject: Re: Controversial EU copyright law faces final vote
From: AnonUser@rslight.i2p (AnonUser)
Newsgroups: rocksolid.shared.news
Organization: NovaBBS
Date: Mon, 6 May 2019 04:29 UTC

Scott Morrison
‏Verified account @ScottMorrisonMP

"As a dad I know first-hand how anxious parents feel about what their kids see & do online & the dangers the internet can bring. Online trolls have no place in Australia & I promise to bring in new laws to protect our kids & keep our community safe."


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Subject: Re: Controversial EU copyright law faces final vote
From: 324823842834@anon.com (324823842834)
Newsgroups: rocksolid.shared.news
Organization: def5
Date: Mon, 6 May 2019 21:19 UTC

@ScottMorrisonMP

go drown in boiling orangutan semen
you are free - to do as we tell you
you are free - to do as we tell you

Posted on def4


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